The new frontiers of eco-design

The Saint-Ouen Research Centre near Paris, which opened in March 2012 and is dedicated to hair research, is the new spearhead for sustainable innovation at L’Oréal. Thanks to a 100 million euro investment and nearly 500 researchers, the centre is dedicated to designing the hair products of the future. Here is a guided tour.

Centre de l'innovation capillaire

Saint-Ouen has become the nerve centre of hair innovation where the products of the future are prepared

Centre de l'innovation capillaire

Saint-Ouen has become the nerve centre of hair innovation where the products of the future are prepared

With its green architecture, eco-design and sustainable innovation processes, the new Hair Research Centre is proof of an overall strategy that associates performance and responsibility. Architects, managers and researchers have made eco-design the foundation of their approach.


  • Robot de coloration
  • Laurent Attal, Vice-Président et Directeur Général Recherche et Innovation de L’Oréal à la tribune.
  • Inauguration du nouveau centre recherche et Innovation de L’Oréal avec Laurent Attal et Jean-Paul Ag
  • Il est essentiel de tester les produits élaborés par la Recherche autre part qu’en laboratoire.

  • Palm oil is an important raw material for cosmetics and holds a leading position in L’Oréal’s approach to responsible sourcing. By late 2012 all L’Oréal’s palm oil was purchased in accordance with sustainable procedures, the aim of which is to ensure the preservation of biodiversity. Since 2010, direct purchases of palm oil, amounting to approximately 850 tonnes in 2012, are based on RSPO SG (Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, Segregated Model) certified total traceability. Since 2012 another category of ingredients, palm oil derivatives the sourcing chains of which are very complex, have also been certified as sustainable by the RSPO. They are, for example, certain surfactants that perform the detergent and lathering functions of shampoos. They are offset by GreenPalm certificates, the purchase of which makes it possible to market an equivalent volume of palm oil that is certified as sustainable. The objective in the long term is that all palm raw materials should come directly from plantations that the RSPO certifies as sustainable.